A Short History of Tea

While travelling the world climbing mountains, studying Buddhism and learning about different cultures, B. K. McManus fell at peace most when sipping a cup of tea. Visiting remote villages in India’s northern most states to exotic forests in the Golden Valley of Ceylon led him to discover the deepest treasures of the natural world. The journey began here studying the history and culture around tea, trekking closer to the border of China in search of its deepest roots. Discovering true artisan handpicked tea produced the traditional way supporting local farmers in a sustainable way. The Tea Sommelier brings to you the very best organic artisan loose leaf tea and herbs from across the world. Read more of The Journey

Hello tea drinkers, catechin tea leaf teasom

It has been an interesting time discovering the in-depth chemical and biological studies regarding the effects of commercial and artisan quality teas on the human body.

I will attempt to answer about catechins and how they are useful for the human body.

Catechins are a type of polyphenol which are powerful antioxidants.  This natural phenol is a plant secondary metabolite (this means it is not essential to the plant growth but essential to its own protection) and is a part of the flavonoids family. 

The etymology of the name catechin comes from catechu which is a bitter juice or boiled extract of the plant Mimosa catechu (Acacia catechu).

So what are these antioxidants helping us achieve?

Catechins are perhaps the strongest kind of polyphenols.

They typically lend a great hand in fighting free radicals that encourage arterial buildup and degrade the body at a cellular level.  This in-turn leads to the susceptibility of the body to contract disease of the heart, cancer and other degenerative diseases.

 

Catechins in tea seem to be all round healthy for your body.  And the cardiovascular system itself.

The benefits of these lend a hand to lowering blood pressure, cholesterol levels and reducing stress.

With a healthy diet, sensible consumption patterns and in a good frame of mind, tea gives an excellent addition to a healthy diet. 

 

"One cup does all disorders cure

With two your troubles will be fewer

Three to the bones more vigor give

With four forever you will live

As young as on your day of birth

A true immemorial on the earth"

(Chinese Proverb)

 

One of the most talked about antioxidants found in green tea is EGCG, (Epigallocatechin gallate) has been scientifically studied in improving memory and learning. It has also been suggested to reduce iron-accumulation in studies of neuro-degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and dementia.

 

There are a few other kinds of catechins and they all count for a certain percentage of the solids of the leaf.  This amount varies according to the varietal and how the tea is grown/processed.

 

This must be so great for us!

 

Can't you see the physiological difference yourself?

 

Wild, hand-crafted tea certainly feels great and helps to keep our inner working's clean and virally protected with anti-fugal, anti-bacterial properties, help to boost the immune system and potential anti-cancer properties.

 

You can feel good tea.  It has a special energy. A freshness that is nourishing.

Hello tea drinkers,

It has been an interesting week discovering the in-depth chemical and biological studies regarding the effects of commercial and artisan quality teas on the human body.


I will attempt to answer about catechins and how they are useful for the human body.



Catechins are a type of polyphenol which are powerful antioxidants.  This natural phenol is a plant secondary metabolite (this means it is not essential to the plant growth but essential to its own protection) and is a part of the flavonoids family. 

The etymology of the name catechin comes from catechu which is a bitter juice or boiled extract of the plant Mimosa catechu (Acacia catechu).

So what are these antioxidants helping us achieve?


Catechins are perhaps the strongest kind of polyphenols.


They typically lend a great hand in fighting free radicals that encourage arterial buildup and degrade the body at a cellular level.  This in-turn leads to the susceptibility of the body to contract disease of the heart, cancer and other degenerative diseases.


Catechins in tea seem to be all round healthy for your body.  And the cardiovascular system itself.

The benefits of these lend a hand to lowering blood pressure, cholesterol levels and reducing stress.
With a healthy diet, sensible consumption patterns and in a good frame of mind, tea gives an excellent addition to a healthy diet. 

"One cup does all disorders cure

With two your troubles will be fewer
Three to the bones more vigor give
With four forever you will live
As young as on your day of birth
A true immemorial on the earth"
(Chinese Proverb)

One of the most talked about antioxidants found in green tea is EGCG, (Epigallocatechin gallate) has been scientifically studied in improving memory and learning. It has also been suggested to reduce iron-accumulation in studies of neuro-degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and dementia.


There are a few other kinds of catechins and they all count for a certain percentage of the solids of the leaf.  This amount varies according to the varietal and how the tea is grown/processed.


This must be so great for us!


Can't you see the physiological difference yourself?


Wild, hand-crafted tea certainly feels great and helps to keep our inner working's clean and virally protected with anti-fugal, anti-bacterial properties, help to boost the immune system and potential anti-cancer properties.


You can feel good tea.  It has a special energy. A freshness that is nourishing.